TRANSMISSIONS FROM ALLGUIDES

One of the ways I process experiences in my life is through Intuitive Journaling. In that process, I often get messages from a group of beings I call "Allguides" as different voices come in based on what I am experiencing at the time I'm journaling. I am sharing some of that on this page because I find these messages very interesting and as I've shared with others about these, I've gotten good responses. Enjoy!

9-19-18 KCP: Ok to whoever is tapping on my shoulder. One only.

GODI: GOT BIGGEST ETHERIC FINGER TO TAP WITH. YOUR ENERGY IS LOW BUT BETTER THAN THE PAST.

THE WARRIOR BUFFETS THE BODY HARD WHEN POSSIBLE. BUT THERE IS AGE AND INFIRMITY THAT PRECLUDES THE BATTLE. IN THE MIND IS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT THAT TO ENTRAIN THE BODY.

THERE COMES A TIME IN A BATTLE OR SIEGE THAT STRONGLY INDICATES A CHANGE IN **STRATAGEM** THAT IS YET UNCLEAR. ANY ACTION WITHOUT THOUGHT OR OBSERVATION WILL FAIL IN IT'S INTENTION . A MOST UNCOMFORTABLE **TIME** FOR IT IS TIME THAT IS NEEDED TO SORT OUT THE NEXT THING. HARD IT IS TO LET GO OF WHAT YOU KNOW THAT NOW DOESN'T WORK.

SEE WHERE YOUR SENSE OF YOUR SELF IS ENTANGLED IN THE DYING APPROACH FOR, INDEED, THAT **WAY** DIES AND LIES DEFEATED. EVEN TAKE TIME TO MOURN IT IF YOU NEED TO. TO FIND CLOSURE WITH A **WAY** OR STATE OF BEING THAT DOES NOT SERVE. THEN YOU ARE OPEN TO OTHER POSSIBILITIES AND **OPTIONS** NOT YET SEEN WHEN YOU WERE LOCKED INTO A CERTAIN WAY NOW ENDED.

(I often get pointed to words for word studies in these messages ~ KCP)


STRATAGEM

stratagemnoun [ C ] 
US  /ˈstræt̬·ə·dʒəm/
plan or trick to achieve something:
Barry devised several stratagems for escape.

stratagem (n.)

"artifice, trick," late 15c., from Middle French strattegemestratagème "trick, especially to outwit an enemy" (15c.), from Italian stratagemma, from Latin strategema "artifice, stratagem," from Greek strategema "the act of a general; military stratagem," from strategein "to be a general, command," from strategos "general" (see strategy). Related: Stratagematicstratagemical. The second -a- is a Romanic misspelling (compare Spanish estratagema)


TIME

time (n.)

Old English tima "limited space of time," from Proto-Germanic *timon- "time" (source also of Old Norse timi "time, proper time," Swedish timme "an hour"), from PIE *di-mon-, suffixed form of root *da- "to divide." Abstract sense of "time as an indefinite continuous duration" is recorded from late 14c. Personified at least since 1509 as an aged bald man (but with a forelock) carrying a scythe and an hour-glass. In English, a single word encompasses time as "extent" and "point" (French temps/fois, German zeit/mal) as well as "hour" (as in "what time is it?" compare French heure, German Uhr). Extended senses such as "occasion," "the right time," "leisure," or times (v.) "multiplied by" developed in Old and Middle English, probably as a natural outgrowth of such phrases as "He commends her a hundred times to God" (Old French La comande a Deu cent foiz).
to have a good time ( = a time of enjoyment) was common in Eng. from c 1520 to c 1688; it was app. retained in America, whence readopted in Britain in 19th c. [OED]
Time of day (now mainly preserved in negation, i.e. what someone won't give you if he doesn't like you) was a popular 17c. salutation (as in "Good time of day vnto your Royall Grace," "Richard III," I.iii.18), hence to give (one) the time of day "greet socially" (1590s); earlier was give good day (mid-14c.). The times "the current age" is from 1590s. Behind the times "old-fashioned" is recorded from 1831. Times as the name of a newspaper dates from 1788. Time warp first attested 1954; time-traveling in the science fiction sense first recorded 1895 in H.G. Wells' "The Time Machine." Time capsule first recorded 1938, in reference to the one "deemed capable of resisting the effects of time for five thousand years preserving an account of universal achievements embedded in the grounds of the New York World's fair."
Jones [archaeologist of A.D. 5139] potters about for a while in the region which we have come to regard as New York, finds countless ruins, but little of interest to the historian except a calcified direction sheet to something called a "Time Capsule." Jones finds the capsule but cannot open it, and decides, after considerable prying at the lid, that it is merely evidence of an archaic tribal ceremony called a "publicity gag" of which he has already found many examples. ["Princeton Alumni Weekly," April 14, 1939]
To do time "serve a prison sentence" is from 1865. Time frame is attested by 1964; time-limit is from 1880. About time, ironically for "long past due time," is recorded from 1920. To be on time is by 1854 in railroading.
time (v.)
Old English getimian "to happen, befall," from time (n.). Meaning "to appoint a time" (of an action, etc.) is attested from c. 1300; sense of "to measure or record the time of" (a race, event, etc.) is first attested 1660s. Related: Timedtiming.


WAY

way (n.)

Old English weg "road, path; course of travel; room, space, freedom of movement;" also, figuratively, "course of life" especially, in plural, "habits of life" as regards moral, ethical, or spiritual choices, from Proto-Germanic *wega- "course of travel, way" (source also of Old Saxon, Dutch weg, Old Norse vegr, Old Frisian wei, Old High German weg, German Weg, Gothic wigs "way"), from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle."
From c. 1300 as "manner in which something occurs." Adverbial constructions attested since Middle English include this way "in this direction," that way "in that direction," both from late 15c.; out of the way "remote" (c. 1300). In the way "so placed as to impede" is from 1560s.
From the "course of life" sense comes way of life (c. 1600), get (or have) one's way (1590s), have it (one's) way (1709). From the "course of travel" sense comes the figurative go separate ways (1837); one way or (the) other (1550s); have it both ways (1847); and the figurative sense of come a long way(1922).
Adverbial phrase all the way "completely, to conclusion" is by 1915; sexual sense implied by 1924. Make way is from c. 1200. Ways and means "resources at a person's disposal" is attested from early 15c. Way out "means of exit" is from 1926. Encouragement phrase way to go is short for that's the way to go.

OPTIONS

option (n.)

c. 1600, "action of choosing," from French option (Old French opcion), from Latin optionem(nominative optio) "choice, free choice, liberty to choose," from root of optare "to desire, choose," from PIE root *op- (2) "to choose, prefer." Meaning "thing that may be chosen" is attested from 1885. Commercial transaction sense first recorded 1755 (the verb in this sense is from 1934). As a North American football play, it is recorded from 1954.

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